VIDEO: Cloud Connectivity and Hybrid-IT Enablement Webinar Recording - Cavern Technologies

VIDEO: Cavern Technologies Cloud Connectivity and Hybrid-IT Enablement Webinar Recording

Webinar topic: Solving app modernization challenges

Check out the video recording of the webinar Cavern hosted focused on solving app modernization challenges with Amazon Web Services (AWS), Effectual and Megaport.

Presenters:

  • Sean Khurana, President of Cavern Technologies
  • Jason Rook, Global Modernization Lead, AWS
  • Tom Spalding, CTO, Effectual
  • Les Thomas, Solutions Architect, Megaport

AWS, Cavern Technologies, Effectual, and Megaport recently held a webinar to discuss solving application modernization challenges with AWS. Learn more about how these companies work together to help enterprises migrate and modernize applications in the cloud.

 


 

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

Good morning, everybody. I would like to welcome everyone to a very exciting webinar organized by Cavern Technologies today. My name is Sean Khurana and the president of Cavern Technologies, and it is my great pleasure to be the emcee of the event. Today, we are fortunate to have a few various team guests that I will introduce in just a second, along with the topic of the day. But first things first, I’d like to welcome all of you in the audience. We got over 200 people who expressed interest in signing up. This is a pretty exciting event for Cavern and for all of us who are presenting. So, in terms of welcome first, I’d like to welcome all of our customers. I know a lot of familiar faces and lots of folks that we know from yours. Thank you for joining also others who are not customers or friends, or just have an interest in this webinar. Welcome. Thanks for joining us today.

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

Now today’s topic is a very interesting one. It’s titled as solving app modernization challenges with AWS. This is a topic that we hear quite a bit from our customers, our prospects, and lots of our friends. It’s really on the minds of lots of us who are in the technology industry. So, what we did was we put together a team here of three really great speakers in three different organizations to really talk through this subject in a holistic way. So, the folks that we have are there are three speakers. One of them is the first one is Jason Rook from AWS. He is the global modernization lead. Really, nobody’s better in this field. And Jason, in terms of subject matter expertise – really would look forward to hearing what Jason has to say on this app modernization opportunity specifically. I think what Jason is going to focus on is how does an organization look at migrating legacy applications to cloud-native applications. And yes, that includes Microsoft applications. So, it’s a pretty interesting topic that we would be looking for Jason to elaborate on.

The second person on our panel today is Tom Spalding. Tom is the chief technology officer from Effectual and effectively what Tom will be doing is talking about the same subject, but he’ll be taking a more of a professional services perspective on it. So as Jason is going to take an AWS perspective, Tom’s going to take a professional services perspective on it. And by the way, Effectual is a great organization. And what they do is they have a lot to adapt in the AWS platform. So really excited to hear from Tom as well and welcome Tom.

And then finally we have Les Thomas. He is a solutions architect with Megaport, and many of our customers already know we have a longstanding relationship with Megaport and have worked for over two years. They are in our facility and we really signed up with Megaport two and a half years ago. And we are so glad we did. They are really good at providing these nimble connectivity solutions to the customers, including cloud connectivity solutions. So as you can see, if you combine Jason’s expertise from an AWS perspective, Tom’s expertise from a professional services perspective, and Les’s expertise from a connectivity perspective, that kind of connects all the three things together, for a holistic view if you’re customer cavern. Or if you’re considering something like this, and your problem statement is app modernization legacy applications to the AWS platform, including Microsoft applications. That’s the topic of the day. So very excited, very interested in what our speakers have to say.

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

We do have a Q&A session at the end, but I wouldn’t want anybody to wait for their Q&A until the end. Since this is a webinar, you can just type in your questions at the top of your screen or at the bottom, depending on how your Zoom is organized, there should be a Q&A button to click on that, and you should be able to type in your questions. We would like to take as many of the questions as possible today. We should have time for that, but if you do not have time for all the questions, again, thanks to our esteemed panelists, they have agreed to take those questions even after the meeting. They’ll be available to all of us as, as attendees for individual sessions. And what we will, what you should expect is at the end of our conversation today, you should get a follow-up email from us, and that email would have contact information of all of us, including the three great speakers that we have. So more to come on the Q&A side, but please feel free to start putting in your questions already have a couple of pre-submitted questions that I will probably be able to sprinkle in as we, as we keep going through this, this discussion.

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

So, like I said, we have several of our attendees here who are customers of Cavern, but we do have quite a few that are not customers of Cavern. So, before we turned this over to the AWS, Effectual and Megaport teams for conversation, I thought it’d be worthwhile talking about Cavern, just a couple of slides, discussing who Cavern is. Number one. And number two, why Cavern is relevant to this discussion. Cavern is a colocation facility. Why are we presenting this webinar with these great speakers? And how does Cavern fit into that? So – two slides. So let me just kind of run through those real quick.

The first slide here is about the key differentiators for a Cavern. So, for many of us who don’t know Cavern, Cavern has a location in the Kansas City Metro. We are a colocation facility. We are the market leader in the Kansas City market. And we are in the city called Lenexa, which is Southwest of the Kansas City Metro. So we, you know, lots of things we could say about, about Cavern. But when I was thinking about this, I thought – well for the audience that doesn’t know Caver – let me just point out these four things that will give you a good brief introduction to Cavern.

Number one is our location. We are in a facility that if you see the picture on the right, in this presentation, you actually can see a couple of entries into, into an underground facility. So we are actually a very kind of mysterious-looking underground facility in Kansas City, 125 feet below ground. So, what this does is kind of gives you a bunker-like thinking as you go in – very secure facility – that’s become one of the big reasons why Cavern has been able to succeed in the last 13, 14 years of existence. We have become the primary destination for financial services, for healthcare and technology firms, and really blessed to have a continued growth that is extraordinary from a colocation perspective.

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

The second thing that’s special about Cavern is that we do private suites. So, we don’t do cages, which is kind of a unique statement to make for a colocation facility. It’s typically what you would expect in a colocation facility is cages. We, in fact, do private suites only, and we’re able to justify and, and do an ROI on all of these suites because we’ve got a very strong focus on OPEX. And then our CAPEX is low because we are an underground facility. Our temperatures are maintained into a certain range, and our build-out is lower because we’ve got this natural cover above us. So, we’re able to pass that on to our customers and provide customized, private suites to them, which makes us also very attractive to most of our customers.

The third reason why Cavern is different is that we have a track record is 100% uptime. At the end of the day, our customers believe in us. They trust us. Those are the words we hear from them. And it’s only because we can produce results. And we have 100% uptime for the last 13 years in existence, driven primarily by our day-to-day focus on operational excellence, processes, automation, tools are the reasons why our operational excellence model works.

And then finally, the fourth thing is an ecosystem of partners, which is where this webinar fits in. We have, we know we are a colocation facility. So, a few years ago, we decided that we wanted to align ourselves as the customer needs were changing to make sure that we are able to represent, if we don’t have some services, be able to represent with the partnership mentality, with an ecosystem of partners a full solution to our customers. And that is what is relevant for the conversation today. We are a colocation facility, but we know our customers are talking about hybrid IT. They’re talking about connectivity and we want to present a complete solution to our customers at our own tables. So, with that context, here’s kind of what our ecosystem of partners looks like today. So, you can see Cavern is sort of in the middle, no surprise there be a co-location facility. And we have one, two, three, four, five areas that we have established over the last few years – are critical for us to represent that full view to our customers. I’ll go through those real quick.

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

The first one on the left side is connectivity solutions. So, we are an interconnection carrier because we have 11 traditional carriers in our facility. Then we signed up with Unitas recently and Unitas as a managed services solution from a network perspective, they’re sort of a super carrier. And then we have a relationship with Megaport, which is one of our esteemed guests today. Les is going to be speaking from the Megaport side. Very exciting group – Megaport. Very nimble software defined solution. So that’s part of our – let’s call it – first group of ecosystem partners. Second is our cloud services providers. Of course, the big three. Jason is representing AWS today. Again, could not be more excited about that. And that’s a real relationship that we have with AWS all the way into the field in Kansas City.

Infrastructure as a service providers. These are folks that provide infrastructure services all the way down to a specific specialty. FNTS as an example has real specialty in IBM mainframe work. So, we are able to build those capabilities with our partners and bring them to our customers. Data center transformation and migration. I put Sirius there as an example, but essentially what this is is work workload placement, workload assessment. The work that we do with them to ensure that our customers who are looking at hybrid IT in their architecture – are making assessment of moving from their own data center – can really have the initial conversation with us and through us in our own conference rooms. Generally, these are conversations that happen in the headquarter boardrooms. We are beginning to see that many of these effective conversations are happening in our conference rooms because we are able to bring this great group of – ecosystem of partners – together.

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

And last but not the least, specialized MSPs and professional services. As you can see Effectual as a part of that today. So, you know, we are able to bring not only professional services for the public cloud piece, but also for very specialized managed services that we are able to provide. Lots of details behind that one too. So, if you look at this ecosystem of partners, you’ve got 3 here today, you’ve got AWS, you’ve got Megaport and you’ve got Effectual. And we have a problem statement that is very common to our customers. So, we thought – what a better way to organize this webinar – you know, led by Cavern, but bring all these three people – three great speakers – together. Jason, Tom, and Les to talk through this. So, without further ado, I’m going to turn this over to Jason. Jason is going to tee it up and come over to the virtual state, so to speak, and discuss today’s topics, solving app modernization challenges with AWS. Jason.

Excellent. Thank you, Sean. Thank you for that introduction. I’m going to just flip the presentation for us here and get started. So as Sean mentioned, my role here at AWS is to help customers and partners to build and enhance their application modernization strategies. And that sounds a little confusing, hopefully over the next 10 minutes, I will clear that up for you and give you some food for thought around the topic of application modernization. So first, let’s just kind of dive into what the heck is modernization, right? I think every vendor and solution provider that you talk to has a different definition or point of view in terms of modernization. At AWS, we kind of came up with our own point of view and that’s modernizations is the process of progressively transforming apps and infrastructure to extend into higher-value cloud-native services that can unlock new business capabilities, accelerate innovation and reduce technical debt.

Speaker: Jason Rook, AWS

It sounds like a bit of marketing speak. What I think is really important about that statement though, are really two things. First, this idea of progressively transforming. So – modernization is continuous. It’s not a milestone on a project plan or an end game – it’s always happening. And the second component is kind of this relationship between innovation and reducing technical debt, or we’ll just call it reducing costs for now. You’ll see that as we talk about modernization, those two concepts, innovation and cost reduction,  kind of go hand in hand in this really interesting correlation. So, how do customers kind of start on a modernization journey? Well, I think the one thing to realize that no customer’s modernization journey is the same, but for the most part, unless you’re lucky enough to be born in the cloud or a digital native, for the most part, customers start with some type of an on-premise footprint. So, whether they have their own data center or servers in a closet somewhere, they’ve got applications and services that are running on their own on-premise footprint.

Most customers start with – Hey, I’m going to kind of start down this modernization path, and the first step is to get some of that infrastructure stuff running in the cloud. So, what we see as kind of the most common first step is this idea of lift and shift. So, I’m going to take my apps and I’m going to move them to the cloud. And what we see after that point is that customers start to get more applications running in the cloud and more familiarity, what they start to do is they start the right size, they start to optimize, they start to build scripts and automation. They start to look at their overall portfolio and manipulate their portfolio to gain efficiencies of scale. And they become to get to a point where they’re more we’ll call optimize. And in AWS, most of that infrastructure service is running on what we call EC2, but we see this point all along the journey where the customer really starts to become familiar with the cloud and they become a little bit more optimized.

Speaker: Jason Rook, AWS

And then what happens from that point is the customers start to kind of look at – how can I embrace more cloud-native services? So how can I start to replace some of that stuff that I lifted and shifted with things that are more tuned in designed for the cloud? So, a common example is a customer might have a large monolithic application. They start to decompose it and reconstruct it with microservices. We see customers that then kind of take what they’ve moved from a lift and shift fashion and start to use container services. Some customers start to take their entire, their dev-ops culture and processes and tools and map them across their entire organization. But what you’ll see here is these two kinds of key lines I mentioned earlier that correlation between innovation and in cost – as innovation continues to go up what we see as the cost of compute goes down – and I’ll come back to that because it’s a really important concept when you think about modernization. When you’re on that journey, there are a lot of decisions that have to be made. There’s decisions about infrastructure and security and data throughput and all of those types things. But I think that most customers kind of start with, what am I going to do with my applications?

So, let’s just kind of do an example and walk through maybe the decisions around one particular application. Let’s say I have an application that’s Windows-based and it runs SQL server, and it’s probably built in .NET framework, right? Incredibly common application with customers. That customer may look at that application and say, you know, my first step of my modernization journey is I’m just going to relocate this thing. I’m going to do that lift and shift motion. I’m going to package it up in a virtual machine. I’m going to get it running in an AWS EC2 and that’s kind of my first step. The Customer might say, you know, I really don’t want those components. So, I’m going to go ahead and re-platform some of that. I’m going to take that app that’s running in a virtual machine and I’m going to move it to containers. I’m going to take that sequel SQL database. And, you know, maybe I still want the SQL components, but I don’t want to do the care and feeding of the SQL server.

Speaker: Jason Rook, AWS

So, I’m going to move that to more of a managed SQL server database in AWS. It’s kind of a re-platform decision. The customer may also say, you know, that’s not where I want to end up. I want to end up in a much more efficient manner because I’ve seen these slides that tell me that my cost of compute goes down when my level of innovation goes up. So, that customer might take that application. They may take that data framework app and refactor it into .NET five or .NET four. They may take the database component – the SQL component of that – they may take that and move it to an open source database. So, they’re removing some of the SQL licensing costs. They’re also getting some scale from the open technology they’re using. But there are multiple decisions that a customer makes along this journey and they’ll make them different for every application and they’ll make them at different points in their journey timeline as well.

So, I like to just kind of go back to that concept of innovation and cost and add one more kind of criteria to it. And that’s this idea of infrastructure, environment, architecture, and app. So, what you’ll see is the customers that are really getting the most ROI out of their modernization journey are putting the most emphasis on architecture and application, and probably the least amount of emphasis on the infrastructure component. In fact, they’re probably jettisoning most of that infrastructure piece in leaning more heavily towards apps and architecture. So, let’s go just a little further on this. If you’re going to do all this work, you’re going to refactor applications, those types of things, you probably need some tools. So, over the next three or four minutes here, I’m just going to do a little bit of product slideware. But the point is to kind of give you an idea of some of the tools that exist in the AWS ecosystem to help us to help you along the modernization journey.

Speaker: Jason Rook, AWS

So, the first of which we’ll talk about developer tools – that compute component – I have mentioned compute several times, Michonne containers and databases. I haven’t yet talked about tools or skills. So, let’s jump into that. The first is just developer tools. And I think if you think about that scenario, I painted with a SQL server or a windows SQL app .NET framework. It’s a very common scenario, right? And many customers have written in-house applications with .NET. .NET is actually a first-class citizen here at AWS. It was the first SDK that we had ever published. Over 12 years, we’ve released several SDKs and innovation around .NET. The point here is that with AWS, it’s a great place for your .NET developers to kind of live that modernization journey with you.

The next piece is that I mentioned the compute several times. And when you’re on this modernization journey, what is really important is that you have choices. So with AWS, what we do is we try to give customers the ultimate flexibility in how they manage compute and how they embrace compute. So I’ve mentioned EC2, which is really that infrastructure component. I mentioned the containers several times, so we’ve got containers, service management, we’ve got containers, serverless containers. We also have serverless functions. The idea here though is that as you go through that journey and you make those decisions, refactor, re-platform, re-host that you’ve got multiple options around compute – because again, innovation goes up, cost of compute goes down – and that flexibility is really what you’re looking for. Now, I mentioned containers several times. What I think is interesting about containers when I talk to customers is just the sheer momentum around container usage. So, we at AWS have seen 450% growth in container utilization over the last five years. What I think is more staggering is that there are hundreds of millions of container services accessed or utilized every week at AWS. So, this is technology that customers are using and using aggressively on their modernization journeys, and you’ll see it pop up in any of your modernization conversations.

Speaker: Jason Rook, AWS

I mentioned database – in that scenario that I kind of painted it with the .NET app and windows and sequel. I talked about re-platform or refactor that database. One of the things that we realized is our customers were telling us that they wanted a more cost-effective relational database. There are a number of commercial-grade, commercial-licensed relational databases in the market, but we stepped back and said, this is a gap that we need to fill for our customers. So, we built AWS or Amazon Aurora. And Amazon Aurora is a relational database built on Postgres sequel, open-source Postgres, but it’s tightly tuned for the cloud. So the idea here is that we were able to provide customers with this relational database that’s about 1/10th of the cost of a commercially licensed database, but highly tuned for the cloud.

So the idea of that as you go through this modernization journey, you’ve got flexibility in database. Furthermore, with flexibility database, there are so many customers that purchase commercial-grade databases, but they only use a fraction of the functionality – they’re paying for the full license, but a fraction of the functionality. So, our concept here is purpose-built databases. And so, what we’ve done is we’ve kind of decomposed or decoupled some of these core functions that customers want to use in commercial-grade databases, and we’ve built them as kind of standalone functions, but they’re highly tuned for the cloud. So, for example, if you need to do key value store, Amazon Dynamo DV is a purpose-built database that maps directly to that particular function. It’s been tuned for cloud. It’s designed to do just key value store. If you’re, if you’ve got time series needs, Amazon Time Stream -there’s another purpose-built database. And there are about 14 of these purpose-built databases. But the idea is that you get this flexibility as you go through that decision matrix of re-host, re-platform, and refactor – again, drive innovation up, cost down.

Speaker: Jason Rook, AWS

Finally, I’ll talk just a little bit about tools. So, we’ve got all these developer components, the database components, purpose-built, all your compute options. There’s a lot of stuff to sort through. So, what we’ve started to do is give customers tooling to help them along this journey, right? So, for example, the re-platforming assistant is simply a tool that helps customers with scripts and decision criteria and processes to move sequel servers from running on windows to SQL server rhino Linux. Some customers that go down this path of kind of deconstructing their databases and moving them to a more modern architecture. Whether it’s Aurora or open source or purpose-built – they’ve got to go kind of look through those databases to understand what their schema looks like, what their storage stored procedures look like. So we have the schema conversion tool to help customers rapidly go through and assess those databases, to understand what that effort might look like.

We’ve got tools – I mentioned containers several times. So, App to Container is a tool that helps customers kind of package up and containerize existing applications, and then migrate them to AWS. And then the Porting Assistant, you know, the power of .NET and .NET core is pretty impressive, but customers need help with making that leap. So the Porting Assistant is a tool to help customers move from .NET framework to .NET four or .NET five. And this is again, modernization is not simple or overnight, right? It’s continuous, it’s, it’s continuous. And it has these kind of two key components, the innovation and the cost reduction. Most customers don’t have the skills to do this right off, right off the bat. So, they look for other people to kind of fill those skills gaps. And so, as Sean mentioned, there’s this ecosystem of partners out there. AWS has thousands of partners, some of which are highly skilled at helping customers through this modernization journey. Probably one of my favorite is a company called Effectual. And now I’d like to introduce Tom Spalding, who’s the field CTO of Effectual to kind of run you through how Effectual helps customers along this modernization journey. So Tom, I’ll turn it over to you.

Speaker: Tom Spalding, Effectual

Thank you very much, Jason – really appreciate it. And as you can probably tell from kind of everything that Jason went through, modernization comes with a lot of choice, a lot of decisions. I’ve thrown up a slide here that kind of even goes beyond just the infrastructure and the capabilities that AWS has – to look at all of the other niche players that have come out to help enable modernization. But at the same time, that enablement kind of gets to the point of when does too much choice become too much choice, and what’s right for me? As a customer, as somebody embarking on this journey, where do I start? Where do I, what do I want to get to? How do I make these decisions? How long is this going to take me? How much is it going to cost me in order to realize these cost savings?

So, I’ll come back to that in a little bit, both to frame why Effectual has been invited here today by Cavern, AWS and Megaport and where we fit into the puzzle. Both Sean and Jason had mentioned it already, but Effectual is a professional services and managed services provider specifically geared towards Amazon Web Services and the collaboration between VMware and AWS – they’re the VMware cloud on AWS product offering. And Effectual brings kind of a cloud-first, security-first approach to enabling that modernization for you. So, as you can see on the left-hand side, we’ve gone out and done our due diligence to ensure that we can display back to you the competency to help you run through this journey. We have specialists both on the commercial side as well as some of the public sector. So, no matter where you are on a modernization journey, we can engage with you to assist and that specialty as well around the collaboration between VMC, between VMware and AWS, the birth, the VMC cloud, it gives us just another tool in the toolbox to help start that journey for our customers.

Speaker: Tom Spalding, Effectual

So, looking at kind of what Jason was going through as well, one of the first things that we’re going to want to do – or the first drivers of modernization – tends to come from the developers. They see all these wonderful tools that they have available to them – the incredible building blocks that Amazon is developing and making available to them. But modernization goes beyond just the tooling and just beyond just the technical capabilities. There’s a people and there’s a process aspect here. So, as you can see here, kind of it’s a little comical, but this is, this is what it can feel like for a lot of companies. Developers are going out and start throwing out words like containers, like serverlets, like lambda, like all of the amazing capabilities that Jason just us through – but that can be terrifying for the operations team – and even more so for the security team.

So what we need to do – and what Effectual comes in to help our customers do – is reconcile these differences between these business units, between these organizations, between these stakeholders, so that a modernization journey brings everyone to the starting line together, and every step along the way is taken in tandem and is taken as a team. So, when we approach a modernization journey with our customers, I’m throwing up this same slide here just to give everyone an understanding of kind of what we’re trying to achieve is a journey. We’re trying to define what is the end goal, but not just what is the end goal? What are the steps to get from where I am today, to where I want to get to. Now, let’s imagine that where I want to get to is containerization for my applications.

Speaker: Tom Spalding, Effectual

Now, every different company will have a different number of steps to get from A to B, that one company could decide that they’re going to go complete scorched earth, and they’re going to go one step from monolithic to containers, and it’s going to be painful and it’s going to be hard, but it’s going to be quick. Another company may have a kind of a more considered approach and it could be up to a hundred steps. Some of those could be enforced upon them, compliance, risk tolerance, cost of when am I outlaying. Again, I’ll bring back the people process of kind of, where do I need to take a pause during my modernization journey to ensure that I’m bringing my people up to speed on modernizing their skills so that they feel like they’re part of this journey with me and that we’re not running out ahead of them.

So Effectual comes in and we act kind of across the life cycle of this modernization journey. And we partner with our customers to build out not just the why of modernization, of building out the business case, building out the quantitative evidence that proves that this is the right way to go for us. Look at all the options and weigh them against each other – good versus bad versus in the middle. Where do I want to be? We go through that into the how – so now we’ve got a goal. Now we’ve got a roadmap. Maybe it’s got 50 steps that we’re going to take. It’s okay. Let’s dig into each one of those steps and what needs to be done in order to make us successful. And then the final piece that we want to do for our customers is that once we get, once we get there, it’s not the end of the journey, unfortunately. when we start talking about dev ops, as you can see here, you’d be hard-pressed to find that, find the beginning and find the end. This is something that is going to continue on. So when we, when we engage with our customers along this journey, what we want to be doing is ensuring that we’re there to act as not just the people to help guide you along, but also the people that can adopt the 24/7 management of where we get to, to ensure that you can continuously progress forwards. To ensure that kind of, as you, as you all are innovating, that you’re not being held down by the day-to-day minutia of keeping the lights on, that you can now take these wonderful new capabilities and really explore them to the nth degree of what is the art of the possible for my business.

Speaker: Tom Spalding, Effectual

So that journey, as I mentioned, it can be anywhere from one month to 10 years. And as you take each step your infrastructure the underlying pieces are going to be changing, not just from a technical or a code perspective, but physical locations. So we’re talking about two physical locations here. We’ve got Cavern as a physical data center. We’ve got AWS, which has physical data centers elsewhere, and the journey is going to be from one place to the other. But between those two, the destination point and the origin, you’re going to be splitting the infrastructure into kind of the best execution venue for that point in time during that journey. So, I’m going to pass off now to Les from Megaport to talk about how that we can maintain a holistic solution for you, that we’re ensuring that the connectivity and the mesh between the journey, is there strong enough to support the end goal. Over to you Les.

Speaker: Les Thomas, Megaport

Thanks for that intro, Tom. And as Tom said, I’m going to be going through that connectivity piece between the Cavern data center and your AWS infrastructure, where all at magic can happen. So, for those who may not be familiar with Megaport, I’ll just start off with a brief intro about who we are and what we do. So, Megaport is a global network as a service company whose main goal is to get companies and customers to the major cloud providers, like of course, AWS, but as you can see, also to the other cloud providers, Azure, Google, Oracle, etc. We operate in over 22 countries and we’ve placed our equipment in the data centers of over 400 various providers around the world. We’ve connected all of these data centers together on a global backbone. And we’ve also connected that backbone into the pairing locations of the major cloud providers. So, we’ve set up our services to mimic the contract terms of cloud providers like AWS so everything’s on a pay-as-you-go basis. No long-term contracts, everything will be spun up and spun down in terms of the connectivity. And it’s in your control. We have an easy-to-use web-based portal. It’s all GUI based, point-and-click, so nobody has to learn any code or a command-line interface because we have a private backbone between the data centers and into the cloud providers. Everything stays on our private network and your traffic never hits the public internet, which is going to give you an added layer of security versus an internet VPN.

Speaker: Les Thomas, Megaport

If you’re in the Cavern data center and you don’t use something like Megaport, you’re going to be using the traditional method. That means getting a last-mile circuit from a carrier, which means you’re going to be into a term contract at least one year. You’re going to have that installation interval, which can be anywhere – 30, 45, 60 – business days from the time you order to the time it’s implemented. And you’re not going to be able to scale that bandwidth up and down. If you want to change from, say one gig to two gigs, you’re going to have to put in a new order. It goes into their provisioning system. And maybe if you’re lucky in a couple of weeks, you’ll get that turned up. And of course, most carriers don’t let you decrease your bandwidth. With Megaport, you’ve got that full flexibility and scalability, and that’s through our portal.

So, how would I get started with Megaport and connectivity for that connection from your infrastructure in Cavern into an AWS environment? So, it’s as simple as setting up a Megaport account. So, you would just go to our website megaport.com and click on the “Try Megaport” button, which is in the top, right. That’s going to get you to a page where you can set up your account, takes you about five minutes. And it’s as simple as like setting up an Amazon prime account. Once that account is set up, you’re going to be given a link to a portal. And that is your company’s private portal that you can go in – you can set up additional users and you can start provisioning services right away. What you would do is order a Megaport port in the Cavern data center that would be through our software defined network. It’ll be configured in a matter of about a minute.

Speaker: Les Thomas, Megaport

And it will also automatically generate for you a LOACFA, or a letter of authorization. That’s going to give you all of the port information on the Megaport side. You just have to download that, send it over to Cavern. Obviously tell them where you want to connect to on your side and Cavern is going to run that cross-connect. It’s going to be installed in a couple of days, and they can also work with you on any expedited requirements that you might have. Once that cross-connect is in place, you’re set up and you can start connecting to the cloud providers like AWS right away, and you can set those connections up in a matter of a couple of minutes.

So, on this diagram, this is just a high-level overview of what that’s going to look like. So, at the top here, you have your equipment in your rack in Cavern data center. You’re going to run that physical cross-connect over to the Megaport rack, where you set up either a one or 10 gig port. That port by default is an 802.1 trunk port that’s going to support multiple V lands and we’ve productize those as virtual cross connects. So, these red lines below are basically those V lands and shows you what is possible in terms of connectivity. Obviously, I’ve highlighted AWS. You can connect to AWS. You can have multiple connections to AWS. Megaport is an AWS partner, so we can deliver the direct connect services. And that is AWS’s product name for the private connectivity to the AWS infrastructure. And this slide just shows you where we reach on the AWS network. So, on the top left here, you have all the cities where we connect into AWS, including the gov cloud. And down here, we have all of the regions that you can connect to. So even though you might have your services situated in the Cavern data center, the big takeaway that I want to give from this slide is you’re not limited to that you can connect to AWS across the globe across the Megaport backbone.

Speaker: Les Thomas, Megaport

And this diagram just gets a little more granular with that connectivity between the Cavern data center, our infrastructure, and into AWS. So again, you can see in the Cavern data center from your rack, from your router switch, it’s just a cross-connect into Megaport where you set up a one or 10 gig port, and then you can set up these connections into AWS. Private VIPs are going to get you into a VPC or virtual private cloud – that isolated environment where you can set up VMs, networking storage. You can also do public riffs that gets you to public resources within AWS software as a service providers or storage and transit Biffs, which will get you into transit gateways, which is the latest gateway from AWS, which provides you with better management of connecting multiple VPCs together. So, this kind of conductivity allows you to do hybrid-cloud solutions, where you have part of your workload in Cavern and part of your workload in a cloud provider like AWS. You could be doing disaster recovery, where maybe you just have offsite storage test and dev environments, and of course what we’re talking today – app modernizing nation.

So just as a quick summary for the connectivity piece that connects into AWS, lets you do all that magic. Pays you go terms for that connectivity, scalable up and down in terms of bandwidth, easy-to-use web-based portal – it’s all point and click. Our software defined network means that there’s no manual process, no orders. We have full API integration with AWS as well as the other cloud providers, which means that those connections can be set up in a matter of about two minutes. Our private network means your data never touches the public cloud, which means you’re going to have a more reliable performance over an internet VPN. You’re going to have consistent latency, no jitter and – extra bonus – because you’re using direct connect services, you get a reduction in the egress fees versus an internet VPN. So that’s the high level of the connectivity using Megaport network. And now I’ll turn it back to Sean. Sean, you got the virtual stage.

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

Thank you so much, Les. What a great job. I can’t be more impressed. Thank you so much for, for that discussion. As our audience can hear and see – what a talent and an amazing three organizations, amazing three people. So again, a heartfelt thanks to all three of you. You know, again, back to the big picture of our customers and our prospects and our friends. The value of this conversation, as you can see is we can have individual conversations with Cavern, individual conversations, with Effectual individual conversations with AWS and an individual conversation with Megaport. The value of this platform is how it all comes together and how we can assist in sort of a combined packaged opportunity with our ecosystem of partners. So hopefully that became clear a bit and we’ll have similar like this again in the future, but you know, similar participants. But again, thank you. Thank you panel for a great conversation.

Back to the Q&A piece. Let’s just jump into that. Now we are seeing a lot of questions come through. So what I’m going to do is facilitate some questions back to the panel here. And hopefully, we’ve got about 10 minutes left where we, hopefully, we can get four or five questions in now. And like I said before, we’re not going to be able to take all the questions – so apologies there – but our panelists are going to be available for taking on your questions individually. That information would be sent to you through email so you’ll be able to access them. And certainly, that’s where Cavern comes in. You’re not going to have to remember anything. You just can send things over to Cavern and we can also make those introductions. Before I go into the Q&A piece, I did want to quote Tom – when you were talking, I wrote one thing down.

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

You said the journey, the journey could take one year to – what did you say – could take one month to 10 years? That just stuck with me. I think – forget the technology point here. I think the point about what you just described, Tom, is amazing. I think that’s the whole point about finding people that in the long journey that, that you can trust and partners. So hopefully that’s where Cavern comes in and can assist and facilitate those relationships. So, my first question that I picked out from lots of questions that we got. I think I’m going to direct that over to you, Jason, and then also to you Tom. I think this is a question that both of you should answer together, but I’m going to ask Jason to start with the answer. The question is: what is the best way to get started with modernization? Should we go all in or should we start slowly? Jason?

Speaker: Jason Rook, AWS

That’s a great question. I think the first thing I’d have to ask is it depends on what problem you’re trying to solve, right? I think there’s probably two groups of problems or two kinds of genres. I’d think of one customer, if you have just a specific application – and this happens to everybody – an application that’s grown too, unwieldly – it’s too costly. Maybe it’s built on legacy versions of SQL server, what have you? I think it makes sense to start with that application and build out around that, right? The other one would be customer that, you know – hey, I’m either not in the cloud or I’ve just dabbled in the cloud – and now I really want to kind of reap the benefits of this innovation. You know, this kind of correlation that I mentioned between innovation and cost reduction. I think that’s more of a, it’s a bit of a start the journey for all in and it’s really kind of step back and take a look at architecture best practices. Well, you know, well-architected best practices, security, and kind of what your existing skill set looks like and what your existing skills are, what your skill sets are going to look like in the future. And I think that larger, more holistic strategy piece is a part that you cannot do successfully without somebody like an Effectual. You can’t, you can’t, you know, start to build that journey if you have no experience or expertise to do it. So, Tom, I’m sure you kind of agree with part of that. What do you, what do you think?

Speaker: Tom Spalding, Effectual

Yeah, that was immediately where my mind went, which a modernization journey needs to be fueled by a business reason that modernizing for modernization sake is all well and good and is all fun, but we’ll eventually peter out when something shiny comes along. So the very first thing to do, if you were looking to start modernizing your business in the ways that we’ve discussed today would be to identify the stakeholders. This isn’t just the CIO, the CTO, or the VP of engineering, or the developers that are buying up and down saying, ‘gimme, gimme, gimme,’ these are the end users. These are the people that you’ll, you’re going to effect their ability to do that jobs, hopefully in a positive fashion, but there may be some pain along the way where they’re going to have to put up with it. And a modernization journey is going to be elongated or delayed if you’re consistently having to fight a political battle, because you haven’t given people a set their expectations for what’s coming down the pipe.

It’s also driven as well in one of two ways that we’ve found, which is there’s either something driving you out or there’s something pulling you towards it. So a modernization journey, you don’t just wake up on January 1st and go, Oh, this is the year I’m going to modernize. It could happen at any point during the year when something’s going to give you a push, maybe it’s you hire in a, an SVP of data analytics and you say, well, I’m going to make data a key strategic goal for my company this year to bring value out of it. And he comes to you with a request for, I want to use, I want a data warehouse or data lake. Now you’ve got a pull, you’ve got something that’s pulling you forward. So I need to be able to modernize, to give this new person the ability to do that job.

So defining what that pull or that push is, is also really important because when things do get tough and you you’re going through that 72-hour migration weekend, where it’s, everything has to be ready by 9:00 a.m. Monday morning, and people are up until four or five in the morning migrating systems, they need to be able to understand the end goal that they’re working towards. So that, that motivation kind of that little, tiny little flicker of fire, a light that keeps pushing them through the early hours is there, and they feel like they’re contributing towards something bigger than themselves.

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

Great answers. Thank you, Jason and Tom, and then also pretty exciting. Similar question – this time, I’m going to go to you, Tom, and maybe we can be a little brief because I’ve got a couple of other questions I’d like to slide in if possible, Tom, and then maybe, Jason, you could add in this time. So, Tom, the question is, can you give me an example of a simple application to start with – sort of links back to the business reasons and things that, that you’ve seen that you were talking to be nice to kind of just get for folks who are not familiar with modernization might be helpful for them to get a sense for, I think that’s the spirit of the question. Give us an example of a simple application that you’ve seen people start with.

Speaker: Tom Spalding, Effectual

Yep. So you can approach that in one of two ways, the, the easy button is a greenfield application. Something that you’re not using today, that you want to implement that in an, in a new, in a new place, implement that into an AWS environment and give yourself a business reason to create an account, create a VPC and, and deliver some value to your, to your users. And then that also gives you kind of a little bit of a sandbox to start playing in. That’s a, that’s a really easy way to get exposure to these technologies. If you’re looking at actually, no, I’m not looking at something new. I want to modernize what I have. The easiest one is going to be the one with the least dependencies on it. When you come to modernizing or migrating or making a change, we like to say at Effectual that there are going to be two things that if it’s going to go wrong, it’s going to be in these two areas – database and networking. They’re two of the toughest challenges to solve. So, find the application or the workload within your organization that has the least dependencies or interdependencies on those two thing.

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

Jason, anything to add?

Speaker: Jason Rook, AWS

I agree with all of those. I think what I see a lot is customers that start with an application that’s very what I’d call self-contained. So I used the example earlier of a windows SQL application, built in .NET framework. That happens a lot. So, whether it’s an application, you know, you know, something sitting in your supply chain, that’s just been capturing data and now you’ve, you’ve lifted and shifted it to the cloud and you’re ready to kind of take it to the next step. I think that’s what we see a lot. The other place is applications that require a lot of updating and feature enhancements. So, if you’ve got to developer team that’s constantly kind of improving an application. What we see there is that sometimes they get slowed down by the infrastructure components of the application, and there’s a strong desire to decouple infrastructure in the app. What we see there is that those are great opportunities because the developers are already highly engaged. And they’re kind of back to Tom’s point about something pulling you. They’re kind of pulling you that direction. So, it helps. But those are the two places I would S I would say – a self-contained app and then a place where you’ve got kind of technical team pulling you down the path.

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

Got it. Thank you, Jason. Just a quick question, quick, couple of questions, and then I think we’ll end. One was this actually more related to Cavern, so I’ll be able to knock that out and respond very quickly. This question is, so going forward, should I think about Cavern as more of a colocation data centers, or can I reach to you for more broad hybrid-IT initiatives? And the answer to that is both. I mean, we’d be still your crusted colocation data center. That’s our core business. We’ve been doing this for 13 years, but we definitely are evolving with the needs of our customers. And we are definitely in that ecosystem that all of us are referencing. You’re going to see that even AWS referenced the need for Effectual and Effectual is referencing the need for networking and Les just talking about Megaport needing the data center. So all these things are going to be connected. So certainly we can effectively, hopefully in your favor in a trusted way, enable those conversations.

Les, I’ll just ask you the last question and that’ll be it. This question is specific to, I think, more connectivity. The question is – if I’m not already at the Cavern data center, how would I connect my headquarter location to the data center, to the DC?

Speaker: Les Thomas, Megaport

The customer can do that using a last-mile carrier. So, we live, Megaport lives inside data centers. So yes, if you want to connect into Cavern, either for colocation or to connect a colocation and onto the cloud, you’d get a last-mile carrier. There are a number of carriers in the Cavern data center, so you can reach out to Cavern and see who’s already there, and probably use one of those existing last mile carriers to connect into the data center.

Speaker: Sean Khurana, Cavern Technologies

Thank you. Last great answers. Thank you, panel. Really appreciate it. Again, kind of gave me goosebumps, listening to you guys. Thank you so much. So that is all the time we have for questions. We’re going to be sending a follow-up email, like I said, after the session with the contact information for all the speakers. There’ll be a connection there and certainly Cavern is willing to be in the middle of that, hopefully, facilitated those conversations. A special thanks to the team that actually organize this, not only the Cavern team, but the AWS team, the Effectual team, and definitely the Megaport team which was in the middle of everything here. So, thank you so much to the entire team for making this happen. I hope that – when I close this event by saying for the audience that you took some value away from this conversation. And if you did, expect us to do more of these. We’ll be sending you and looking for feedback. And once you respond to us, and if it’s specific topics, more ideas like this, this is our goal is to bring additional conversations like this to you.

With that, stay safe everybody and take care. We are adjourned. Thanks.

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